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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Adagio from Concerto No. 23 in A for Piano and Orchestra

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Andante from Concerto No. 21 in C for Piano and Orchestra

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Divertimento in B-Flat

When composers of Mozart’s day were asked to entertain their patrons with party music, they dashed off simple, lighthearted works—divertimentos, serenades, nocturnes and the like—that were hardly worth reusing or remembering. But Mozart being Mozart, even his light music from his late teens and early twenties has withstood the test of time. One patron he would have been especially eager to please was Countess Antonia Lodron, an avid musician herself and one of the most influential citizens of Salzburg. In 1776 he supplied her with a concerto for three pianos that she could play with her daughters, plus a Divertimento scored for a typical ensemble of two horns and strings. He followed up with another Divertimento for the same scoring in June of 1777, to help celebrate the countess’ name day.

Mozart, a strong violinist, probably led the ensemble from the first violin part, and he would have been unfazed by the melodic passages that draw the violin high into its upper range, whether in the fast first movement or during the decorative variations of the second movement. The other substantial inner movement, an Adagio, is exemplary night music, with plucked accompaniment imparting the character of an intimate lovers’ serenade. Twin minuets surround the Adagio as breezy palate cleansers, although Mozart may have pushed the boundaries a bit with a mischievous move to G minor during the first minuet’s contrasting trio. The drama of the finale is even more unexpected, with its introductory recitative that casts the lead violin as a moody soprano in a wordless opera scene.

Aaron Grad ©2018

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Six German Dances

Once Mozart’s long and lucrative run as Vienna’s favorite keyboard player fizzled out, his financial situation became increasingly dire. A small boost came at the end of 1787, when Emperor Joseph II arranged to install Mozart as Kammermusicus, a position held by Gluck until his death that year. Mozart received a modest annual salary of 800 gulden, for which he provided dances for the court ensemble to play at balls. (By comparison, he collected 559 gulden from a single concert in 1785.) It wasn’t exactly the opera commissions or publishing deals he longed for, but at least it was a paying gig.

Mozart wrote 30 short dances during his first two years in that role, including the Six German Dances (K. 571) he completed on February 21, 1789. The “Deutsche Tänze” or “German Dance,” a couple’s dance style in three beats, was a favorite of the emperor, who overlooked its risqué reputation stemming from the close embrace maintained by the couples. (The style endured and evolved into the waltz, the quintessential Viennese dance.) Mozart played into another trend when he capped this dance set with percussive, jangly music in the “Turkish” style—an approximation of the fearsome military bands from Austria’s perennial foe, the Ottoman Empire.

Aaron Grad ©2018

About This Program

The SPCO has teamed up with the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre for a mix of classical, contemporary and comic ballets paired with Mozart’s music. George Balanchine’s Divertimento No. 15 has been hailed by The New York Times as “the most sublime choreography ever made to music by Mozart.” Jiří Kylián combines physical comedy with powdered wigs and dry wit in Sechs Tänze, while his profound Petite Mort integrates fencing foils and black silks with powerful athleticism and musicality, to striking effect.

Tickets can be purchased at northrop.umn.edu, in person at Northrop box office or by phone at 612.624.2345.

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